News ID: 4847
Publish Date:07 July 2018 - 10:33
Flamingos becoming a rare sight as Turkey’s Lake Tuz continues to dry up
Turkey's 'Salt Lake' Lake Tuz in central Anatolia is rapidly shrinking and flamingos for which the body of water has served as a safe haven are becoming an increasingly rarer sight.
ECO-IEST: Turkey's 'Salt Lake' Lake Tuz in central Anatolia is rapidly shrinking and flamingos for which the body of water has served as a safe haven are becoming an increasingly rarer sight.
Lake Tuz, one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world and Turkey's second largest lake in terms of area, provides a perfect habitat and hatching ground for flamingos as the birds usually choose to lay their eggs in salty and wet areas.

The area consisting of the lake itself and its smaller neighboring lakes, namely Akgöl, Bolluk, Düden and Tersakan, is considered to be a Class A wetland. There are 81 internationally significant wetlands in the world and only 18 of them are graded as Class A.

The report states that Lake Tuz has been classified as a "zone that has suffered serious and irreparable damages in the last 10 years or irreversibly lost small but significant parts" according to Special Environmental Protection Area criteria and has been put in the endangered category, meaning the lake needs immediate intervention and protective measures.

With the lake drying up and shrinking, flamingos or other birds which used to frequent the lake are no longer coming to the lake.


Source: Daiky Sabah